Books

A Book Review of The End

WARNING: Reading this article may give away things in the story ranging from unimportant to plot turners.

The End by Lemony Snicket (Daniel Handler)

Type: Adventure, Children’s

Basic Plot: The Baudelaires leave Hotel Denouement, and believe they have finally found people that believe them and a place to live. Unfortunately, even their new home is not as perfect as it is presented.

Quality

Plot: 4/5 Well Done: The end of the story was a combination of satisfying the readers and still leaving mystery. There is a vague idea of what has happened to most of the characters, but you never know what really happened to most of them. Even though most of the characters are not given a definite ending, the endings are enough. There is just enough to satisfy the need for justice and conclusion, but still enough open to leave the readers wondering what might have happened after the books.

Writing Style and Setup: 4/5 Well Done: The writing style was as good as all of the other twelve books were. It wasn’t as dark and satirical in this book, but seemed more serious. It was still just as entertaining, though.

Moral: 1/5 A Negative Moral: The ultimate moral of the story is that it is better to face the world and live in it, even if it is wicked, than to close yourself off from it and try to shelter those you love from it, as wickedness will end up catching up with you anyway. This moral contains things that are true, but it is not completely accurate. It is true that no society or group of people is able to be kept pure. Since sin is in us as humans, if the attack does not come from the outside, it will come from the inside. Despite the fact that this is true, that does not mean we should throw ourselves and our loved ones into the world. God says several times in the Bible that we are supposed to be separate from the world. (Romans 12:2, 2 Corinthians 6;14, 1 Peter 2:9) He also says that Christians are supposed to be simple concerning evil. (Romans 16:19)

It is hard to draw the line of how separate we should be from the world. Should we watch not TV or only good TV? Does it not matter what we watch at all because one day we are going to see something bad on TV anyway? This is a perfect example of the dilemma that the Baudelaires face. The island they land on could be those that say complete separation from everything that could even lead to the slightest wrong should be one hundred percent avoided, while the Baudelaires could be those that believe it does not matter what you watch as long as you don’t actually do those things, as one day you will see them. Neither is really correct, and if one was, it would be complete separation from even the chance to do wrong. The amount of separation the island calls for though is extreme, and to the point where no progress can be made.

In conclusion, the moral is right in that you can never keep something perfect forever, as humans are sinners and all societies will have the depraved and perverse, but it is ultimately wrong in saying that throwing yourself into the world is the answer. The answer is that we should separate ourselves from the world enough to be moral and be a good testimony for Jesus, but still in contact with the world to tell others about Jesus. We don’t have to be Amish to do this, but being Amish is better than being too far into the world. Unfortunately, the moral of the story is that it is better to be too far into the world than too repressed.

Overall: 4/5 Well Done: This book concluded the series in a mysterious way, but still satisfyingly. The ultimate moral of the book series is revealed, and it is shown to contain both good and bad. I would recommend it to boys and girls twelve and older in quality.

Moral Content

Sexual and Inappropriate Content: ½/5 Slight Mention: One of the things mentioned to be in a huge collection of thing is underclothes. A man kisses a woman.

Violence: 1/5 Light and Threatened Violence: There are descriptions mentioning death and violence. A man threatens a child with violence at least twice in the book. He never goes through with it. It mentions that people get in a fight that results in attempted and anticipated violence as well as stepping on another person’s foot. A man shoots another man with a harpoon gun.

Swearing and Using the Lord’s Name in Vain: 0/5 None

Emotional, Intense, and Disturbing Content: 2/5 Some Lightly Intense and Disturbing Content: It mentions in the dedication that a woman has died. It is mentioned that people died in previous books. It mentions the burning down of a hotel in the previous book. A man talks about wanting to hit other people’s cars. Some children wonder if they should push a man overboard, but don’t. It is also mentioned how he could have been killed. A figurehead of a boat has an octopus stuck to a man’s helmet, and it is described as “attacking.” It mentions a submarine and hot air balloon house were attacked, though it does not go into vivid detail. A violent storm occurs, washing some people onto an island. Some children wonder if a man died. He didn’t. Some people want to get weapons to start a mutiny. A woman lies to her daughter about her father dying from a storm or a manatee. A mutiny is partially started, but it does not last and no weapons are ever made. At least two people die, one from poison and the other from a harpoon gun injury. Several other people may or may not have died from poison, but it is never said. Children are worried that there friend is not doing well. It is mentioned that a woman’s feet were crushed. A collection contains skeletons of elephants and skulls. It mentions in a story that a girl lost her ear, that she believes she will be poisoned, a woman murdered someone, and that “children were accused” of murder, though they did not murder anyone. It mentions that children had wondered when they would die. A woman worries they will hurt her or her unborn child if she is moved. Blood is mentioned once, covering a man’s chest.

Religious Issues: ½/5 Slightly Suggestive: There is a man that is called a rabbi throughout the book. There is brief mention of a menorah. Mohammed, the founder of Islam, is mentioned in a quote. A man believes that the natives of an island will worship him “as a god.” They don’t. “Herculean” (a word coming from a myth about Hercules) is used as a description.

Magic: ½/5 Slight Mention: A man says he can tell what the weather is through magic. He can’t. “Magical” is used as a description. A man believes that clay will heal his feet. They don’t. Hypnosis is briefly mentioned.

Others: A man disguises himself as a pregnant woman and wears a dress. People drink coconut cordial, a fermented drink that works like a drug. It is described as an opiate. Halloween is briefly mentioned. A man believes the presence of cards will “lead to gambling.” A man tells a story that mentions that a woman was a drunkard.

Overall: 2/5 Child Appropriate: I recommend the book for ages twelve and older, the worst content being the death of some characters and some of the mentioned injuries and violence.

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Books

A Book Review of The Penultimate Peril

WARNING: Reading this article may give away things in the story ranging from unimportant to plot turners.

The Penultimate Peril by Lemony Snicket (Daniel Handler

Type: Adventure, Children’s

Basic Plot: The children are now growing closer to the conclusion to the chase between them and Count Olaf, but first they hope to figure some things out at Hotel Denouement.

Quality

Plot: 4/5 Well Done: This is probably one of my favorite books for two reasons. The first reason was because most of the living characters are all brought back or at least mentioned. Though most of them are the same, it is nice to see them again, even with their horrible personalities. The second reason is because the hotel is compared to a library, having nine floors based off the Dewey Decimal system. Out of all thirteen places the children go to, I believe this is my favorite.

Writing Style and Setup: 4/5 Well Done: All of the books use the same style, this one being no different, using dramatic irony and defining words and phrases as you read.

Moral: 2/5 An Interesting Moral Dilemma: This book probably focuses the most on whether it is ok or not to do wrong things for the right reason. The author never gives a definite yes or no to this. We know that doing wrong is always wrong, no matter the reason, but as you see the Baudelaires tear their hair out in frustration about if what they are doing is ok or not we can learn a lesson. The Baudelaires are so confused about what is right and what is wrong and what they should do because they don’t have God in their life. The author of the series is an atheist, and though nothing in his books strongly points to this, this fact is probably the reason God is never really mentioned and the subject of “does the end justify the means” is brought up so much. Without God, or at least some unchanging moral code, a person is lost and confused, never knowing if what they are doing is truly right or wrong. The Baudelaires are an excellent example of this. They are told they are “noble enough,” and they tell this to their friends, but they aren’t noble enough. They try to excuse their wrongdoings by saying, “What else can we do?” but then turn around and scold others who use the same excuse. We can learn and teach our children just how confusing and lost we are without God to show us right and wrong. Unfortunately someone could look at this moral and also say that we are “noble enough” and that as long as we are doing it for the right reason, it is ok to do wrong things, but if you if your child is reading this, you can help guide them to not believe this.

Overall: 4/5 Well Done: Out of all of the books the author writes, this one is probably my favorite. I definitely recommend it to boys and girls ten to eleven and older.

Moral Content

Sexual and Inappropriate Content: 1/5 Suggestive: It mentions a girl is wearing a bikini made of lettuce. No pictures are shown. It is briefly mentioned by her husband to be “indecent.”

Violence: 2/5 Non-Detailed and Light Violence: Descriptions and examples are used that sound violent or have violent. A harpoon gun is dropped and shoots another man. A girl is poked in the eye and another one gets run into. A baby bites a woman’s hand.

Swearing and Using the Lord’s Name in Vain: 0/5 None

Emotional, Intense, and Disturbing Content: 2/5 Some Emotional and Lightly Disturbing Content: It mentions in the dedication that a woman has died. It is mentioned that people died in previous books. An opera is mentioned and it describes some of the violent and traumatic things that happen in it. It does not go into detail about the events. It is mentioned that Snow White dies from a fever and that a forest burnt down. It is mentioned that a woman once broke her finger. A figurehead of a boat has an octopus stuck to a man’s helmet, and it is described as “attacking.” The picture is shown, though it is not close up or seem disturbing in any way. A man wants to poison people with a fungus, but doesn’t. Some children and a man burn a hotel down, and it is suggested that many people die in it.

Religious Issues: ½/5 Slightly Suggestive: There is brief mention of several different religious buildings such as shrines, temples, mosque, monastery, and synagogue and the brief mention of a rabbi. A knot called the Devil’s Knot is mentioned.

Magic: ½/5 “Magical” is used as a description. Unicorns are referred to.

Others: There is a picture of a man dressed in a maid’s costume as a disguise, and another picture that suggests a woman was disguised as a man. Opium is briefly mentioned. Cigarettes and cigars are both mentioned. One man smokes so much that the smoke covers his face. A cocktail party is mentioned throughout the book. It is mentioned the different ways a certain woman may be related to the reader, and mentions “or even your husband” as a possibility.

Overall: 2/5 Child Appropriate: The death and suggested deaths of characters makes it recommendable for children ten to twelve and older. The most objectionable thing would probably be the brief reference that a woman could be a husband, though since this was written in a time when homosexuality and transgenderism was not really accepted (especially the latter), it is very possible that it was not meant the way that some people may take it. It doesn’t mean that it wasn’t meant in a bad way, it just means that there is a good chance that it didn’t mean any harm.

Here is a link to the thirteenth review:

https://christianentertainmentreviewsblog.wordpress.com/2017/03/28/a-book-review-of-the-end/

Movies

A Movie Review of The Peanut’s Movie

 WARNING: Reading this article may give away things in the story ranging from unimportant to plot turners.

The Peanut’s Movie by Blue Sky Studios

Type: Cartoon, Children’s

Basic Plot: Charlie Brown is determined to do something to impress the “little red-haired girl” that has just moved to town, but his plans always seem to go horribly wrong.

Quality

Plot and Story Organization: 3/5 Average: The story was interesting, but some of the circumstances and the ending were either a bit expected or foreseeable. Some of the ways it happens are not always so predictable, but the eventual outcome is not surprising.

Graphics: 5/5 Excellent Quality: I tend to have an affection for originals and the way I am first introduced to something, but even though this movie’s graphics were very different from the originals, I still really liked them. The graphics were still similar to the original, just much, much fancier. The shading was amazing, as well as the details such as water and clouds.

Moral: 4/5 Good Applications: Charlie Brown wants to change himself and his reputation so that the little red haired girl will like him. Almost everything he tried ends in embarrassment or not as planned and in the end he believes she will never love him. By the end though, she ends up with him not because of any awards or great achievements, but because of his good character and morals. This is definitely a good moral for anybody.

Overall: 4/5 Well Done: The movie was excellent in graphics and moral, though the story may be a little predictable. It was not a tedious or boring movie, and I recommend it to all ages of either gender.

Moral Content

Official Rating: G

Sexual and Inappropriate Content: ½/5 Just Slightly Suggestive: Charlie Brown is shown in his boxers twice. It shows a boy in a bathtub, but nothing is shown from the waist down. A dog kisses a girl.

Violence: 1/5 Mentioned and Light Violence: There are several small accidents such as tripping or things hitting Charlie Brown on the head. A girl does a karate routine for a talent show, though it only shows the aftermath. There are airplane fights and crashes. Someone slips and punches someone else.

Swearing and Using the Lord’s Name in Vain: 0/5 None

Emotional, Intense, and Disturbing Content: 0/5 None

Religious Issues: 0/5 None

Magic: 0/5 None

Others: There is some dancing. There is a pop song with drums playing in the background. One or twice a costume or impersonation a boy dog does may be seen as feminine.

Overall: 1/5 All Ages Appropriate: This movie is recommended for all ages and has nothing very objectionable in it.

Books

A Book Review of The Grim Grotto

WARNING: Reading this article may give away things in the story ranging from unimportant to plot turners.

The Grim Grotto by Lemony Snicket (Daniel Handler)

Type: Adventure, Children’s

Basic Plot: The children have been rescued by a V.F.D. volunteer and are now looking for the mysterious sugar bowl.

Quality

Plot: 4/5 Well Done: The plot was very well put together. Events were connected, things happening that at the time had little to no importance, but later had a huge importance to the story. Relationships were also more focused on in this book.

Writing Style and Setup: 4/5 Well Done: The writing style is as good as usual. Since the books are much longer than when the series first started, the author now has more space to use his style. He takes a little more time to drag out his

Graphics: 4/5 Well Done: The graphics were done in the same style as the ones in the previous book, pencil sketches. They were again scattered with clues about what would and will happen.

Moral: 2½/5 A Good Moral: This book again does not focus really on morals, but the morals it does focus on are mostly good ones. One of the morals in the book is that some things are better not known, especially things that have to do with sin. The children wonder many things in the book that the adults around them won’t tell them, but in the end the author says that there are some things in the world no one should ever know about. The Bible says in Romans 16:19, “For your obedience is come abroad unto all men. I am glad therefore on your behalf: but yet I would have you wise unto that which is good, and simple concerning evil.”

Another thing discussed is that “people are neither noble nor evil.” A man tells the children that everybody does both good and bad and that no one is truly good or bad in the world. He is half right, as even the righteous in history have done and wrong and people known for doing bad do sometimes do right. God’s way of looking at this though is not that people are therefore neither good or bad, but that all people are bad. In Romans 3:10 it says, “As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one:”. People who do wicked things are wicked, an only those saved by Jesus Christ can say they are righteous through him.

Overall: 4/5 Well Done: This book is recommendable is quality for boys and girls eleven to twelve and older.

Moral Content

Sexual and Inappropriate Content: ½/5 Slightly Suggestive: A boy and a girl are accused of flirting. A girl kisses a boy.

Violence: 1/5 Light and Mentioned Violence: “Violently” and “violent” are used to describe.  A man mentions that a shark hurt his leg. A woman hits a group of children and is mentioned hitting children with a giant noodle, though it does not leave any injuries. Descriptions and examples are used that might be considered violent. A man mentions throwing “thumbtacks” at a baby a long time ago. A man mentions different ways he could kill some children, including drowning and strangling.

Swearing and Using the Lord’s Name in Vain: 1/5 Some Misuse: God’s name is taken in vain once.

Emotional, Intense, and Disturbing Content: 2/5 Some Intense and Lightly Disturbing Content: It mentions in the dedication that a woman has died. It is mentioned that people died in previous books. Children are threatened throughout the book. A child is poisoned with a mushroom and at a slow rate nearly dies. A woman threatens to beat people with a giant noodle if they don’t do what she says, though it doesn’t really hurt anybody. A man thought some children had died and had “celebrated their death.” A man’s leg is hurt. The poem “My Last Duchess” is mentioned as well as the theme. It is about a jealous man having his wife killed. Characters cry throughout the book.

Religious Issues: 1/5 Slightly Suggestive: While making exclamations, a man mentions Buddha and Charles Darwin. Mythology is mentioned and creatures called Gorgons. There is a picture of one in the book.

Magic: 0/5 None

Others: Wine is mentioned once, but none is drunk in the book.

Overall: 1½/5 All Ages Appropriate: This book is morally recommendable to children ten and older, the worst thing being God’s name being taken in vain once and a key character almost dying.

Here is a link to the twelfth review:

https://christianentertainmentreviewsblog.wordpress.com/2017/03/21/a-book-review-of-the-penultimate-peril/

Movies

A Movie Review of Beyond the Mask

WARNING: Reading this article may give away things in the story ranging from unimportant to plot turners.

Beyond the Mask by Aaron Burns and Chad Burns (Producers and director)

Type: Action, Christian, Historical

Basic Plot: William Renalds is on the run for crimes, both being ones he did and didn’t commit. As he tries to hide under different masks, he comes to love a girl named Charlotte, who he feels is too good for him. Deciding to redeem himself in the eyes of man, God, and Charlotte, William hides under a mask that he hopes will finally bring him honor.

Quality

Plot and Story Organization: 3½/5 Above Average: This movie reminded me of a Christian, Revolutionary War style super hero movie.  There are explosions, chase scenes, fights, and technology that for the day would be advanced. Some people may think that some of the technology is a bit ridiculous, as the technology in the movie was not something that actually did exist in the colonial days, but it was no more unrealistic for its time than anything seen in a super hero movie set in modern times. Some of the actions of the characters were a bit odd or unrealistic at times, but were for the most part believable.

The story was a bit choppy at times, but moved overall well. Details in between events could have been shown more, but the lack of showing them does not ruin the movie or make it feel incomplete.

Acting: 3/5 Average: The acting was better than some Christian movies I have watched before, but some of the characters were a little weak. I think the best actors were probably the protagonist and antagonist and the weakest ones were the love interest and some secondary characters.

Costumes and Scenery: 4/5 Well Done: The costumes were beautiful and realistic. They were far from looking cheap or fake, and were modest. The scenery was also realistic and well done, but night shots looked better than shots done in the daytime, especially outside.

Music: 3/5 Average: The music was appropriate for the mood, but none of it was very memorable or extraordinary.

Moral: 5/5 Excellent Application: The moral of the movie is that we can not earn God’s “forgiveness and love.”  William knows that he has done much wrong in his life and rightly feels unworthy as a person to face God and Charlotte. He decides to earn redemption by saving people and becoming well known. Later Charlotte tells him that you can never earn “forgiveness and love,” but that you just have to accept it from others. Eventually, William realizes this and accepts God’s gift rather than trying to redeem himself.

Overall: 3 ½/5 Above Average: This movie was better than some Christian movies I have seen. The story was interesting, the acting was unbearable, and the costumes and scenery were a good quality. For a Christian film, that’s pretty nice. I believe boys from childhood to their early teens would like the movie best, but I also recommend it to families to watch with their children.

Moral Content

Sexual and Inappropriate Content: ½/5 Slightly Suggestive: A man and woman kiss, once on the lips and once on the cheek, as well as hug. Once or twice some women’s dresses may be thought to be a little bit low by some, but no cleavage is ever shown. A man is lying sick in bed shirtless, though a blanket covers more than half his chest.

Violence: 2/5 Some Non-Graphic Violence: A girl falls off of a boardwalk and a boat. A man whips another man. Some people are shot with a gun and crossbow from a distance and are killed. There are several fights that include guns, fire, bombs, electrocution, and physical attacks. People sometimes die from these fights. There are explosions and attempted explosions, some resulting in death. Some men attack another man and almost tar and feather him. Most of the results of the violence are not shown by the camera.

Swearing and Using the Lord’s Name in Vain: 0/5 None

Emotional, Intense, and Disturbing Content: 2/5 Some Emotional and Slightly Intense and Disturbing Content: Some Homes are burnt down. Violence and disturbances are caused by people. A man is threatened with tar and feathers. A windmill explodes. An entire city is threatened with explosion. People die from shooting, fist fights, and electrocution. Blood shows up twice, and a man gets a scratch on his face. Several times a man gets injured, though it does not show his injuries. A man is going to be hung but never is.

Religious Issues: ½/5 Slight Mention: A man disguises himself as a vicar for the Church of England. He is seen wearing his robes, and people call him Reverend and parson.

Magic: 0/5 None

Others: A man goes to a tavern and orders ale, though he is never seen drinking it. A man has the East India Company’s tattoo on his arm.

Overall: 1½/5 Almost All-Ages Appropriate: The movie is recommendable for children eight and older, as some of the violence and explosions may be scary for little children.

Books

A Book Review of The Slippery Slope

WARNING: Reading this article may give away things in the story ranging from unimportant to plot turners.

The Slippery Slope by Lemony Snicket (Daniel Handler)

Type: Adventure, Children’s

Basic Plot: The Baudelaires have been separated. Sunny has been kidnapped, and Violet and Klaus have been flung down the mountain path in a caravan. While both are trying to survive their horrible surroundings, they are also both trying to find out more about V.F.D.

Quality

Plot: 4/5 Well Done: The last four books in the series are probably the best. This one starts answering a few questions, but at the same time opens up a bunch more. The subject of the series has now officially completely changed. Since I don’t want to give anything away, I’ll just say that this book was definitely creative.

Writing Style and Setup: 4/5 Well Done: The style was as good as the other books and the pacing was good. Since the children were separated, it switched between their perspectives, but never seemed choppy or awkward. It also left in places that would be good cliffhangers or suspenseful.

Graphics: 4/5 Well Done: The graphics were done in the same style as the ones in the previous book, pencil sketches. They were again scattered with clues about what would and will happen.

Moral: 3/5 A Good Moral: Some of the other books have touched on wondering if it is ok to wrong if for a right reason, and though this book does not conclude the subject, it does show that doing wrong for the right reason is wrong. The children think of a few plans to recover their sister or escape, but they decide that they would be wrong and choose not to do those things. In the end some of their immediate problems are solved in another way.

Overall: 4/5 Well Done: This book starts the best part of the story and is definitely recommendable. I recommend it for ages twelve and up for either age in quality.

Moral Content

Sexual and Inappropriate Content: 0/5 None

Violence: 1/5 Light and Mentioned Violence: A woman pinches a little girl several times. Some bugs sting people. Some people whip the air. A girl wonders if she should attack people with a knife, but she doesn’t. It mentions being “trampled by an ox” in an example. It mentions the book Anna Karenina, and how Anna Karenina “throws herself under a train.”

Swearing and Using the Lord’s Name in Vain: 0/5 None

Emotional, Intense, and Disturbing Content: 2/5 Some Slightly Disturbing and Emotional Content: It mentions in the dedication that a woman has died. It is mentioned that people died in previous books, and that other people not mentioned in previous books have died. There are mentions of places being burnt down and places that people want to burn down in the future. There is also mention that some people may want to burn other people. Some people wonder if a girl is trying to “poison” them with “raw toast.” She isn’t. A girl gets a cut on her lip from biting it. A man says you can use floss to strangle people. It mentions some reasons why you may need a refrigerator, all of them having to do with death or light violence. It mentions that two women may have died. A man wants some women to throw a person off the mountain and he later attempts to do it. He also tells a little girl to push some people off a mountain. No one is pushed off the mountain. Some people kidnap a baby and make her do the manual labor and mock her. Information about the author says that he “presumed dead” even though he actually isn’t dead.

Religious Issues: 1/5 Slightly Suggestive: Adam and Eve are mentioned, but their sin in the Garden of Eden is presented in what could be seen as a humorous or nonchalant manner. A false Egyptian god is mentioned.

Magic: ½/5 Slight Mention: The fairy tale “Cinderella” is mentioned as well as the fact that magical things are in it. “Ghost” and “ghostly” are used for a description. A “sleeping potion” is mentioned in an example.

Others: Wine is mentioned twice, and wineglasses are mentioned. Jazz music is mentione. A woman finds some signaling devices that she thinks are cigarettes. A man smokes a cigar.

Overall: 2/5 Child Appropriate: The book is recommendable for children morally ten and older, mostly because of the light dark humor.

Here is a link to the eleventh review:

https://christianentertainmentreviewsblog.wordpress.com/2017/03/14/a-book-review-of-the-grim-grotto/

 

Books

A Book Review of The Carnivorous Carnival

WARNING: Reading this article may give away things in the story ranging from unimportant to plot turners.

The Carnivorous Carnival by Lemony Snicket (Daniel Handler)

Type: Adventure, Children’s

Basic Plot: The Baudelaires are now in disguise to hide from Count Olaf. With hope that one of their parents is still alive, they are trying to survive as they are surrounded by friends and enemies.

Quality

Plot: 4/5 Well Done: The plot was definitely interesting. The characters choices were in character and realistic. Some of the choices they made were bad, but you could definitely see that they would and why they would make them. The only con was that it was a little slower in developing than the last one without the suspense build up being as good.

Writing Style and Setup: 4/5 Well Done: The style was definitely satirical in this book. The author does several things that were humorous or sad or both at the same time. The details of the book to explain or describe situations were definitely what makes the style good.

Though Graphics: 4/5 Well Done: The graphics were done in the same style as the ones in the previous book, pencil sketches. They were again scattered with clues about what would and will happen.

Moral: 3/5 A Good Moral and More Coverage of an Ethical Dilemma: The moral that can be seen in this book is a good one. One of the new characters introduced in the book lives by the motto, “Give people what they want.” She is willing to do anything anyone ask, even if it is wrong, because she just wants to please everyone and not pick sides. She eventually dies because of her refusal to make a decision.

The book also covers more of the ethical dilemma mentioned in the last article, but I am saving the majority of this discussion for article twelve.

Overall: 4/5 Well Done: The book was definitely recommendable in quality. I recommend it in quality for children of either gender of the age of eleven.

Moral Content

Sexual and Inappropriate Content: ½/5 Slightly Suggestive: People are kissed on the cheek and nose.

Violence: 2½/5 Mentioned and Non-Descriptive Violence: It discusses what part of an animal is the most violent and scary. There is “a painting of a lion chasing a… boy.” A boy worries about what will happen if they travel. People are described as “violent.” A carnival comes up with the idea of throwing people into a lion pit for entertainment. Several people want a person to be thrown to the lions and volunteer to throw someone in. Some children lie about their sister attacking them when they tease her, and say that the attacks resulted in scars. A person pretends to attack an audience for entertainment. A man threatens to hit people with a giant noodle. A man whips lions and at people. It hints that a man in a fairy tale was eaten by lions. It mentions some violent situations the children had escaped in previous books. A girl briefly remembers a sword fight she had. A woman wants some people to push a specific woman to the lions in exchange for a job. A woman and man fall into a pit of lions and are eaten, though it does not go into much, if any, detail.

Swearing and Using the Lord’s Name in Vain: ½/5 A Little Misuse: “Gosh” is used once.

Emotional, Intense, and Disturbing Content: 2/5 Some Slightly Emotional and Disturbing Content: It mentions in the dedication that a woman has died. It is mentioned that people died in previous books. Children are threatened. Some adults talk about wishing to kill and/or kidnap children. Animals have scars. Several people want to throw other people into a pit of lions for entertainment. Some children put fake scars on for a disguise. It mentions that a woman’s makeup looks like a bruise. A boy thinks that his sister, when she is in a certain costume, looked like she was eaten by animal. It mentions that a woman was in a “play about a murderer.” A carnival employs people with unusual body traits such as ambidexterity or having a humpback to be put on display. These people are mocked at and are later almost thrown to lions. The treatment of these people is greatly looked down on and made into a satire in the book.

Religious Issues: ½/5 Slight Mention: It mentions a rabbi.

Magic: 1½/5 Phony Magic: A woman claims to be a fortune teller and to be able to read a crystal ball. She is not actually able to tell peoples fortunes by using a crystal ball, but uses a non-magical way. The woman and her crystal ball are described throughout the book as “magic” and “magical” by people. It mentions vampires. “Ghost” is used as a description.

Others: People drink throughout the book. A man mentions there is wine in the trunk of a car. One of the disguises that one of the children tries is disguising as a wolf person, and they tell a man that the wolf-person came between a romance between a wolf and a human.

Overall: 1½/5 Almost All Ages Appropriate: This book is morally recommendable to almost all children. Violence is probably the most objectionable thing. Though violence does happen, it does not get into detail.

Here is a link to the tenth review:

https://christianentertainmentreviewsblog.wordpress.com/2017/03/08/a-book-review-of-the-slippery-slope/